Code of EthicsCode of Ethics

Canadian Humanistic and Transpersonal Association Code of Ethics, Principles and Practice Guidelines for the Provision of Services

Adapted from: UK Association for Humanistic Psychology Practitioners website, 28/09/2010; "Recommended Principles and Practices for the Provision of Humanistic Psychosocial Services: Alternative to Mandated Practice and Treatment Guidelines" of the Humanistic Psychology Division (Div 32) of the American Psychological Association; The Ethics of Caring – Honouring the Web of Life in Our Professional Relationships, Kylea Taylor (recommended by David Lukoff, PhD, President, Association for Transpersonal Psychology); "Body Oriented Psychotherapy - History, Methodology, Ethical and Clinical Considerations", Canadian Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling, Vol1 No1, 2011; Transitional Council of the College of Registered Psychotherapists and Registered Mental Health Therapists Council meeting minutes 22/09/2010; Code of Ethics of Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis; OISE Counselling Clinic website, 28/09/2010; British Health Protection Council chair interview in the UKCP newsletter The Psychotherapist, # 45; Code of Ethics of the Australian Psychological Society www.psychology.org.au Note: Throughout this document 'client' and 'patient' are used interchangeably 1

Introduction

The Canadian Humanistic and Transpersonal Association (CHTA) Code of Ethics, Principles and Practice Guidelines1 has the following intent: to help CHTA professional members practice the highest standards of integrity, impartiality, confidentiality and respect for the individual in their work and to inform the general public of the principles under which the CHTA professional members provides services;1 to create a framework of understanding within which clients and interns can safely work and grow;1 to establish basic standards of expected professional conduct;1 to maintain a continuing humanistic and transpersonal context within which CHTA professional members operate;1,3 to foster a context of mutuality in which there is a recognition of shared responsibility for decision making and action toward facilitating healing, growth and realization of potential.3

It is understood that the following guidelines cannot cover all specific areas of potential ethical and practice issues that may arise.6,1

These Code of Ethics, Principles and Practice Guidelines will be amended to include relevant input from the Transitional Council of the Ontario College of Registered Psychotherapists and Registered Mental Health Therapists as their deliberations are made available.

2 Fundamental Values and Practice Guidelines 1

CHTA professional members respect the dignity, worth and uniqueness of all individuals. We are committed to the promotion and protection of basic human rights, the integrity of the individual and the promotion of human growth, development and welfare. We affirm the self-determination, personal power and self-responsibility of the client. We are concerned for the best interests of the clients and make every effort to protect the welfare of those who seek our services.1,2,3

The therapeutic relationship is founded upon trust and informed consent. The sensitivity of the client-therapist relationship requires that the therapist scrupulously avoid all forms of exploitation of clients and their families and prevent the intrusion of self-interest.6, 1

CHTA professional members are committed to creating and maintaining proper clinical records in a confidential and secure manner.5

CHTA professional members respect the privacy of the individual and preserves the confidentiality of any information acquired through professional practice or research. See Privacy and Confidentiality policy below.

CHTA professional members do not practice, condone, facilitate or collude with any form of discrimination on the basis of race, colour, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, marital status, political belief, mental or physical disability or any other preference or personal characteristic, condition or status.1

CHTA professional members recognize the unique challenge involved in therapeutically mediated touch. Those practicing body oriented forms of psychotherapy are expected to have received appropriate training in the clinical and ethical issues involved. For more information please see "Therapeutic Uses of Touch" document.4

CHTA professional members shall behave professionally and in public in a manner that does not reflect disgracefully on the practice of psychotherapy, the CHTA or other professional members.5,6

3 Competence

CHTA professional members recognise the boundaries and limitations of their techniques and their own personal expertise. They only provide service and use techniques for which they are qualified by training and experience. They take whatever precautions are necessary to protect the welfare of their clients and refer them on to other professionals whenever appropriate.1

CHTA professional members recognise that they work in a developing and highly active field in which valuable new ideas are constantly emerging. They continually monitor their own knowledge and capabilities and have an ongoing commitment to continue to develop their personal competence.1

CHTA professional members recognise that personal problems, temporary or enduring physical or mental incapacity, and other conflicts may on occasion interfere with their professional effectiveness. In such circumstances they seek appropriate professional assistance, supervision, support or advice.1

CHTA professional members are committed to an ongoing process of self reflection as part of ensuring their capacity to serve their clients fully and grow as clinicians.2,5

4. Privacy and Confidentiality 8, 9

CHTA professional members recognize that all records in client files are confidential and are retained in secure files.

Information pertaining to counselling, psychotherapy or assessments, including written reports, may only be released to other parties with the informed consent of legally authorized persons (usually the persons who gave the initial permission for the assessment). The CHTA recognizes that confidential client information may be discussed with a practitioner's supervisor. There are also exceptions to the confidentiality policy that are required by law. Clinicians must report to the appropriate authorities when there is suspicion of child abuse, when clients indicate that they may pose a significant danger to themselves or others, when clients or other persons report sexual abuse by a health care professional, or when the court issues a subpoena for record or testimony.8

Notes:

  1. UK Association for Humanistic Psychology Practitioners website, 28/09/2010;
  2. "Recommended Principles and Practices for the Provision of Humanistic Psychosocial Services: Alternative to Mandated Practice and Treatment Guidelines" of the Humanistic Psychology Division (Div 32) of the American Psychological Association;
  3. The Ethics of Caring – Honouring the Web of Life in Our Professional Relationships, Kylea Taylor (recommended by David Lukoff, PhD, President, Association for Transpersonal Psychology);
  4. "Body Oriented Psychotherapy - History, Methodology, Ethical and Clinical Considerations", Canadian Journal of Integrative Psychotherapy and Counselling, Vol1 No1, 2011;
  5. Transitional Council of the College of Registered Psychotherapists and Registered Mental Health Therapists, Council meeting minutes 22/09/2010;
  6. Code of Ethics of Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis;
  7. OISE Counselling Clinic website, 28/09/2010;
  8. British Health Protection Council chair interview in the UKCP newsletter The Psychotherapist
  9. Code of Ethics of the Australian Psychological Society www.psychology.org.au
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